Wind Energy

People learnt to use wind power in very ancient times. Apart from windsailing, the first construction using wind energy is considered to be a windmill for grinding grain. The invention of windmills is assigned to ancient Persia (approximately 200 B.C.), the technology was brought to Europe by the Crusaders in the 13th century. We also know that water pumping stations with a windmill were widespread in many European cities in the 16th century (for example, in the Netherlands water was pumped from the land enclosed by dikes in order to expand agricultural land).

The first wind turbine for electricity generation was developed in the late XIX century. The first wind power plant was built in Denmark in 1890, and by 1908 there were more than 72 wind turbines, with a capacity raging from 5 to 25 kW.

As of today, the unit capacity of a wind turbine can reach up to 8 MW. Generators with the capacity of more than 10 MW are being developed.


On a worldwide scale, installed capacity of all wind turbines is about 370,000 MW.

The total wind power generated by all the world's wind turbines in 2014 is estimated at 700,000 million KWh (which represents about 3% of the electricity needs of the world).

Country

Installed capacity, MW

Share in total generation, %

China

114763

2,6

USA

65879

3,5

Germany

39165

8,6

Austria

2095

4

Poland

3834

3,6

Ukraine

498

0,6

Lithuania

279

6,4

Belarus

39

0,002

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The sphere of wind energy is rapidly developing and widely publicized in the international community. In connection with the problems of air pollution, emissions of greenhouse gases and the limited fossil fuels, high hopes are laid on wind power (as one of the most eco-friendly renewable energy sources).

Already today, wind energy provides an opportunity to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere by over 330 million tons in a year.


Construction of wind farms in the Republic of Belarus is a relatively new area of ​​energy development.

As of today, there are a little more than 60 wind power plants operating in the Republic of Belarus with a total capacity of about 40 MW. Nevertheless, the share of electricity generation from wind in the total electricity production in the country is close to zero.

That is why the implementation of the international technical assistance project “Removing Barriers to Wind Power Development in Belarus” is very important for the country and it will show the public the importance and need for the development of wind energy as an inexhaustible source of environmentally friendly electricity.